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Mandala Crocheted Blanket Bag Pattern – Mama In A Stitch

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I created this blanket bag crochet pattern over the summer and can finally share it with you today!  You know that I love to make wearables, but it’s awesome to change things up every now and then. This crocheted blanket doubles as a bag so it’s quite unique and handy. Rather than trying to shove my park blanket into a bag with my snacks for a day outside, now I can fill my blanket and cinch it closed.  I’m thinking it makes a fun little beach bag too!  What do you think?

The pattern is simple and I’ve included a step by step tutorial below on how to get started below.  If you can double crochet and crochet in the round, this project will be very easy.  The Lion Brand Mandala yarn is available in amazing colors and I just love the variety of blues in the skeins used for this blanket bag.    If you like the look of the blanket itself without turning it into a bag, it works really well to add a retro pop of color to a chair and it makes super cute toddler or baby blanket. As usual, you can find the free pattern below and Lion Brand has also made this into a kit which you may choose to purchase on their website!

Above: There you have your pretty, little crocheted blanket

Below: The blanket’s now become a bag – fun, fun!

This blanket bag is made mostly with double crochet stitches so it works up fairly quickly considering it’s size.  It’s almost like Granny’s doily turned giant! Once you have your circular blanket finished, you will simply braid or chain some super bulky yarn to make the rope handle.  There’s no need to make special holes in the pattern for the rope to slide through as it is worked right through the existing stitches.  You will see how simple it is to put together in the picture tutorial and video below.

You guys, I am no video expert, but I made this little video last summer so you can see how this works! Haha! Kinda cheesy, but you get the idea right? Click to play it below!

Above: It also works as a simple, pretty throw or baby blanket.  My blanket turned out to be 41″ in diameter so it’s a nice lapghan size.

As usual you can find the ad-free printable pattern in my Etsy shop HERE, or you can find the free pattern below!

It really is like you’re making a “Mandala” with this pattern.  The color changes are beautiful as you work the rounds and there’s always a new and exciting color coming up next so I never got bored.  I do tend get bored with large projects but not the case with this one.  Have you tried the Mandala yarn yet? My daughter recently saw a rainbow color version at Wal-Mart so I have a scarf in the works for her. It’s super soft and while I don’t often do color, I really enjoy how the yarn works up.

Here it is….making a mandala with “Mandala” yarn!

Crocheted Mandala Blanket Bag Pattern

You know those certain projects that you’re especially excited about? This is one of those for me. EEEK! I think because it’s so unique – the blanket turns bag, turns play-mat, turns toy carrier, turns carry-all after all.  It’s also completely useful and pretty. One pull of the drawstrings and your blanket turns into a generous sized bag. And because of the amazing self striping Lion Brand Mandala yarn, the pattern is as simple as can be since there are no color changes. The yarn did all that work which is a plus for me.  I like easy. ­čÖé

You will need:

Size H, 5.0 mm crochet hook

2 skeins of Lion Brand Mandala “Spirit” Worsted Weight Yarn 591 yards or you can purchase the kit from Lion Brand Yarn HERE

150 g/skein (uses approximately 277 g)

1 skein of Hometown USA Super Bulky Yarn 142 g/skein in New York white or preferred color (uses approximately 23 g)

Scissors

Tapestry Needle to weave in ends

Skill Level:

Easy +

Abbreviations/Skills needed:

dc – double crochet

ch – chain

sk – skip

st – stitch

sl st – slip stitch

rnd – round

*You should be familiar with crocheting in the round

Gauge:

Not important for this pattern, however please note that I am a LOOSE CROCHTER! This means that my blanket may have turned out larger than yours if you crochet tightly.

Size:

Approximately 41” inches in diameter

Notes:

This pattern uses the basic method of slip stitching to join rounds and the first chain of each row counts as a stitch. You may use another method of joining rounds if you prefer.  The pattern begins by creating a granny circle and later turns into basic double crochet stitch-work in the round.

Counting stitches in each round is a helpful way to ensure your blanket will turn out correctly.

Mandala Blanket Bag Pattern

Granny Circle Center

With your Mandala worsted weight yarn, chain 5 (below), slip stitch to join in order to form a ring

Rnd 1 Ch 3 (this counts as your first dc), make 11 dc into the ring. Sl st to join into first ch. (12 stitches)

Rnd 2 Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), make second dc in same space. Make 2 dc in each space around and sl st to join at end of round (24 stitches)

Rnd 3 Ch 3, make 2 dc in same space. Continue to make 3 dc stitches in the space between each group of 2 dc from last round, sl st to join at end of round. (36 stitches)

Rnd 4 Ch 3, make 3 dc in same space. Make 4 dc in space between each group of 3 dc from last round, sl st to join at end of round. (48 stitches)

Rnd 5 Ch 3, make 4 dc in same space. Make 5 dc in space between each group of 4 dc from last round, sl st to join at end of round. (60 stitches)

Rnd 6 Ch 3, make 5 dc in same space. Make 6 dc in space between each group of 5 dc from last round, sl st to join at end of round (72 stitches)

Rnd 7 Ch 3, make 6 dc in same space. Make 7 dc between each group of 6 dc from last round, sl st to join at end of round. (84 stitches)

Double Crochet Rounds Section

Rnd 8 Ch 3 (counts as first dc), make dc into same space, *dc in next 6 stitches, 2 dc in next space between group of 7 dc stitches. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (96 stitches)

Important:  For each of the next rounds, end with a single dc stitch rather than the 2 dc stitch group. If you make a 2 dc stitch at the end of a round, you will have too many stitches. Counting stitches will also help to ensure your circle blanket turns out correctly.

Rnd 9 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 7 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (108 stitches) Remember to end your round with a single dc stitch rather than a 2dc group

Rnd 10 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 8 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (120 stitches)

Rnd 11    Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 9 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (132 stitches)

Rnd 12    Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 10 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (144 stitches)

Rnd 13 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 11 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (156 stitches)

Rnd 14 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 12 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (168 stitches)

Rnd 15 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 13 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (180 stitches)

Rnd 16 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 14 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (192 stitches)

Rnd 17 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 15 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (204 stitches)

Rnd 18 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 16 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (216 stitches)

Rnd 19 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 17 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (228 stitches)

Rnd 20 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 18 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (240 stitches)

Rnd 21 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 19 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (252 stitches)

Rnd 22 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 20 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (264 stitches)

Rnd 23 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 21 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (276 stitches)

Rnd 24 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 22 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (288 stitches)

Rnd 25 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 23 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (300 stitches)

Rnd 26 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 24 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (312 stitches)

Rnd 27 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 25 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (324 stitches)

Rnd 28 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 26 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (336 stitches)

Rnd 29 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 27 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (348 stitches)

Rnd 30 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 28 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (360 stitches)

Rnd 31 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 29 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (372 stitches)

Rnd 32 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 30 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (384 stitches)

Rnd 33 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 31 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (396 stitches)

Rnd 34 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 32 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (408 stitches)

Rnd 35 Ch 3, dc in same stitch, * dc in next 33 stitches around, 2 dc in next st. Repeat from * around. Sl st to join. (420 stitches)

Tie off and weave in ends, or continue pattern, increasing by one single dc stitch between 2 dc increases for each round until blanket is approximately 41” inches wide.

Above: The Blanket Bag measures approximately 41” inches across.

Drawstring Rope – Handle Instructions

Cut three lengths of Hometown USA yarn approximately 166” inches (or just over 4.5 yards) long each.

NOTE: Below I show you how to braid the Hometown USA to make a rope, however, you can also simply make a crocheted chain and have the same effect with a lot less work!! 

Tie ends together with an overhand knot and secure with tape or preferred method to a sturdy table or structure.  Braid the three lengths of yarn together loosely. Take care not braid tightly or your drawstring may end up shorter than needed.  To make braiding easier you may wind each strand of yarn into a ball and release as you braid, or keep each strand in a neat grouping while you braid as pictured below. Tie off with an overhand knot when you’ve reached the end. Trim ends neatly. After braiding and trimming, final rope measurement should be approximately 4 yards 10 inches long. Note: If you’ve made a smaller or larger blanket than the pattern indicates, adjust the length of your rope accordingly.

You may also choose to use a large crochet hook and make a chain approximately 4 yards and 10 inches long!

Above: Braiding the drawstring rope with three strands of yarn

Attaching Drawstring Rope Handle to Blanket Bag

With one end of your “rope”, insert it into a space in the third row from the outside of the blanket (see photo).  Weave the rope in and out of the blanket, working it through approximately every 10 stitches around.  Pull through so that the drawstring is even on each side.

Above: Thread the rope through your blanket as pictured. You will then attach the rectangle tab that you see pictured in our next step.

Above: Note the drawstrings span the entire circumference of the blanket and come out to meet on one end.

Handle Attachment Tab

With your worsted weight yarn, ch 8.

Row 1 Sc across row (7 stitches)

Repeat row 1 until piece measures approximately 3.5” long.

Make single crochet border around piece, tie off and weave in ends.

Place the tab on the bottom of the blanket, on the opposite side from where the drawstrings exit. (See photos) With a length of yarn and a tapestry needle, attach tab to blanket, 4 rounds from outside of blanket with a whip stitch on the top and bottom, leaving the sides open.

Above: Whip stitch the bottom and top, leaving the sides open for the rope handle to tie through.

Above: The tab has been attached on the outside of the blanket, opposite end side from where the drawstring pull is located.

Tassels (optional)

Make as many or as few tassels as you’d like for your new blanket bag! Using your worsted weight yarn, cut approximately 17 strands of yarn 11” inches long. Holding the strands of yarn together, fold them in half and tie together as pictured.  Cut another length of yarn and tie around top of yarn.  Trim ends to make them straight and even. Attach tassel near ends of drawstrings.

Instructions for use of Blanket Bag:

After fully assembling your blanket bag, you can easily convert your bag to a blanket at any time.  When your blanket is laying flat on the ground, simply pull both ends of the drawstrings upward.  Attach the rope to the tab on the opposite end with a slip knot, making it any length that you want.  Enjoy!

Above – drawstrings have been pulled to close blanket bag

Above – Pull both drawstrings together through the tab on opposite end

Finish your slip knot

That’s it – now carry it wherever you’d like!

It was a lot of fun to make this unique project.  I hope that you enjoy your new blanket bag and let me know if you have any questions! 

XO,

Jessica

If you love crocheted blankets, you might also like:

Above: Hearthside Blanket Pattern

Above: Simple Crocheted Go-To Blanket Pattern

Thank you to Lion Brand Yarn for sponsoring this post! All opinions are 100% my own.

This content was originally published here.